Major Mistakes Which Hurt Your Oral Care


It’s essential to end up mindful of the propensities you ought to be maintaining a strategic distance from, on the off chance that you need to appreciate fantastic dental wellbeing.

Along these lines, here are 5 of the most widely recognized missteps that are harming individuals’ dental wellbeing:

1) Brushing Too Hard

The vast majority’s boss point when brushing is to wind up with a decent white arrangement of teeth, and this leads a few individuals to clean much too hard with an end goal to evacuate stains.

Bushing too hard can harm the polish covering that encompasses your teeth. With that defensive finish layer debilitated, plaque has a free rule to eat into your teeth.

Humorously, brushing too hard really accomplishes the inverse impact and gives the teeth a darker shade, since finish is the whitest part!

Try not to brush your teeth just as you’re scouring a red wine stain from a floor covering! You don’t have to apply much weight at all to evacuate ordinary stains.

2) Not Brushing For Long Enough

Your dental specialist prescribes that you brush for an entire 2 minutes, yet information gathered by Beam Technologies has demonstrated that the normal grown-up spends only 46 seconds brushing their teeth.

That is a poor exertion by all accounts!

Research has demonstrated that you are half more prone to brush for a considerable length of time in the event that you utilize a clock.

Split out your cell phone and start up the clock application when you brush for a moment help to your dental wellbeing.

3) Uneven Brushing

Individuals tend to start brushing with energy, before getting exhausted lastly surrendering. This implies the edge of your mouth that you start with gets a decent spotless, yet the rest gets only a careless going over.

We can, at the end of the day, swing to a clock to enhance our propensities here. Just change to another quadrant of the mouth at regular intervals.

Beginning in an alternate region of the mouth every time you brush can likewise offer assistance.

4) Fruit Juice Before Bed

Natural product juices and smoothies have turned out to be to a great degree prevalent in the most recent couple of years, particularly as a simple and delectable approach to get one of your five-a-day.

The issue, however, is that these juices are definitely not useful for your teeth. They’re both brimming with sugar, and unequivocally acidic; a bad dream mix for your teeth.

More grown-ups who can’t rest have a tendency to get up and snatch a glass of smoothie, before retreating to rest.

Leaving this acidic and sugary deposit on your teeth throughout the night while you rest is not a smart thought! The corrosive debilitates your teeth’s guards, whilst plaque microbes flourishes with the sugar.

On the off chance that you do get up in the night, make that drink a decent, spotless, icy glass of water.

5) Not Flossing

No one appreciates flossing their teeth, however tragically, it’s an absolute necessity!

Toothbrushes essentially can’t get in the middle of your teeth, and that implies that in case you’re giving the dental floss a miss, you’re leaving a wide range of nasties in those niches and crevices.

Regardless of the fact that you brush industriously twice per day, the nourishment particles and plaque microbes that gather between your teeth can prompt Gingivitis on the off chance that you don’t floss.

So hunker down, split out the dental floss, and make it a propensity to floss each prior day you brush your teeth. Continue reading “Major Mistakes Which Hurt Your Oral Care”

Dry Mouth Medicines Your Mouth


Many medications Americans take can affect dental and oral health? Taking certain prescription and over the counter medications can cause dry mouth “xerostomia”, effect your taste buds on tongue which results in ultimate feeling of food taste and even cause changes to your periodontal health ” gums”.
What should you dental care provider dentist and your dental specialists know about my prescription medications?

It is important to tell your dentist and dental hygienist about every medication that you take. They will also want to know how much and how often you take your medicines. Even vitamins, minerals, herbs and natural health supplements are important for them to know about. Learn more here.     L

Information your dentist and dental hygienist need to know about your medications at your dental exam?

Your dentist, oral care professional and dental hygienist need to know all your medications, dosages, medical conditions and why you are taking them so you can receive accurate optimum dental treatment. Prescription medication and OTC supplements you take have side effects that can be important to dental treatment and oral health. 

Over 400 medications can cause dry mouth ” xerostomia” and make your mouth feel dry chronically and gradually without you noticing it immediately. 

The list includes certain drugs for high blood pressure Hypertension, mainly anti depression, and anxiolytics anti anxiety. The list include some cold and allergy medication drugs that can make a person oral mouth very dry gradually.  

Diabetes can cause dry mouth and xerostomia. Severity of dry mouth may contribute to deep root cavities. Lack of hydration not enough to drink or dry indoor places can make our mouths feel parched and very dry. Be sure to tell your dentist and dental hygienist if your mouth feels dry, uncomfortable or painful so that they can help you. A dry mouth can add to your risk of getting cavities, deep root decay, periodontal bone loss, gum disease, bad breath or Halitosis , mouth sores and sometimes systemic infections. A major contributor in difficulty to wear dentures, and to chew and swallow food.

OTC over-the-counter, prescription drugs and herbal medicines can make easy bruising and bleeding more easily. The list include aspirin, ibuprofen, Coumadin®, Pradaxa® and Plavix®. Significant number of herbal supplements cause lack of hemolysis bleeding changes, including garlic, gingko biloba, ginger and ginseng. Inform your dentist, dental specialist and dental hygienist of taking any of these drugs, prescriptions or supplements.

250 drugs and OTC supplements can change the way you taste foods. Some medications produce a bad aftertaste in your mouth. Often people suck on hard candy, breath-mints or even cough drops to make their mouth feel better. Many of these contain sugar, which can lead to cavities. Use sugarless candies and breath-mints instead. If your medicine makes your mouth dry, you might have a problem tasting certain types of foods or foods will taste bland. Do not use too much salt or sugar to make your food taste better. This can lead to more cavities, poor diabetes control and higher blood pressure. Tell your physician or dentist if you notice changes in your sense of taste.

Some drugs can cause sores on your cheeks or under or along the side of the tongue. These mouth ulcers can be painful and can make eating, speaking and wearing dentures difficult. Tell your dentist or physician if you get mouth ulcers so they can determine the cause and change your medicine if necessary.

Many medicines can cause dangerous drug interactions with the medicines given in the dental office. These include pain relievers, sedatives and anesthetics. Talk honestly and openly about your medication use. This allows your dental team to make good decisions about your treatment and helps to ensure your oral health and safety.

Healthy Gums and a Healthy Heart: The Perio-Cardio Connection


Cardiovascular disease, the leading killer of men and women in the United States, is a major public health issue contributing to 2,400 deaths each day. Periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory disease that destroys bone and gum tissues that support the teeth affects nearly 75 percent of Americans and is the major cause of adult tooth loss. And while the prevalence rates of these disease states seems grim, research suggests that managing one disease may reduce the risk for the other.

A consensus paper on the relationship between heart disease and gum disease was published concurrently in the online versions of two leading publications, the American Journal of Cardiology (AJC), a publication circulated to 30,000 cardiologists, and the Journal of Periodontology (JOP), the official publication of the American Academy or Periodontology (AAP). Developed in concert by cardiologists, the physicians specialized in treating diseases of the heart, and periodontists, the dentists with advanced training in the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease, the paper contains clinical recommendations for both medical and dental professionals to use in managing patients living with, or who are at risk for, either disease. As a result of the paper, cardiologists may now examine a patient’s mouth, and periodontists may begin asking questions about heart health and family history of heart disease.

The clinical recommendations were developed at a meeting held earlier this year of top opinion-leaders in both cardiology and periodontology. In addition to the clinical recommendations, the consensus paper summarizes the scientific evidence that links periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease and explains the underlying biologic and inflammatory mechanisms that may be the basis for the connection.

According to Kenneth Kornman, DDS, PhD, Editor of the Journal of Periodontology and a co-author of the consensus report, the cooperation between the cardiology and periodontal communities is an important first step in helping patients reduce their risk of these associated diseases. “Inflammation is a major risk factor for heart disease, and periodontal disease may increase the inflammation level throughout the body. Since several studies have shown that patients with periodontal disease have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, we felt it was important to develop clinical recommendations for our respective specialties. Therefore, you will now see cardiologists and periodontists joining forces to help our patients.”

For patients, this may mean receiving some unconventional advice from their periodontist or cardiologist. The clinical recommendations outlined in the consensus paper advise that periodontists not only inform their patients of the increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with periodontal disease, but also assess their risk for future cardiovascular disease and guide them to be evaluated for the major risk factors. The paper also recommends that physicians managing patients with cardiovascular disease evaluate the mouth for the basic signs of periodontal disease such as significant tooth loss, visual signs of oral inflammation, and receding gums.

While additional research will help identify the precise relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, recent emphasis has been placed on the role of inflammation – the body’s reaction to fight off infection, guard against injury or shield against irritation. While inflammation initially intends to have a protective effect, untreated chronic inflammation can lead to dysfunction of the affected tissues, and therefore to more severe health complications.

“Both periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are inflammatory diseases, and inflammation is the common mechanism that connects them,” says Dr. David Cochran, DDS, PhD, President of the AAP and Chair of the Department of Periodontics at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. “The clinical recommendations included in the consensus paper will help periodontists and cardiologists control the inflammatory burden in the body as a result of gum disease or heart disease, thereby helping to reduce further disease progression, and ultimately to improve our patients’ overall health. That is our common goal.”