Pediatric Dentist Advice: How to Tell Your Child Has a Cavity


Pediatric Dentist Advice: How to Tell Your Child Has a Cavity
A pediatric dentist can tell you some things are just unavoidable in the life as a child, and
cavities are one of those instances. With all the prodding and encouragement to brush and floss
well every day, and to make healthy food choices, your child may still end up getting a cavity.
Your pediatric dentist can easily fix the issue once determined, and here are a few ways to tell
that your child is dealing with a cavity:Your child chews on only one side of their mouth. If you have a young child, they may not be able to properly communicate they’re suffering from pain in their mouth. If you can see that your child is consistently choosing to chew food on only one side of their mouth, and it’s always
the same side, your child probably has a cavity.

You can see chalky white spots on your child’s teeth. When your child flashes a smile, and you can easily see white spots or other discolorations on their teeth/tooth, that is a sign that they
have developed a cavity. Schedule an appointment with your pediatric dentist right away to have it looked at.

Your child complains about pain while brushing. It may not be unusual for your child to complain about having to brush their teeth, but it may be abnormal for them to complain about pain while brushing. This is a key sign they are suffering from tooth sensitivity and most likely a cavity.

Your child has a visibly swollen cheek. If you can tell that one of your child’s cheek is swollen compared to the other, that’s a sign something is out of whack, and needing to be immediately
checked out. If your child can’t recall recently falling or bumping into something that may have caused a swollen cheek, be sure to call your pediatric dentist right away.

Prepare your child for their filling appointment. The best thing you can do for your child is to try to diminish any fears they have of seeing the dentist. If you appear to be calm with a positive
attitude, your child will be more likely to not feel as nervous. Showing your child books and pictures of children seeing the dentist, will help to explain that it is a normal and positive experience.

How to prevent cavities in the future. Once your child has seen your pediatric dentist and has gotten their cavity filled, there are certain foods and drinks you should limit as much as possible.
Try to avoid giving your child sugary soda or fruit juice, avoid sticky foods like toffee and other types of candy, and try to see your pediatric dentist twice a year for checkups.

If your child is experiencing any of the symptoms described above, be sure to contact your dental practitioner immediately to schedule an appointment. Your pediatric dentist will be able to
confirm whether your child has a cavity, and the next steps needed to fix the problem along with
tips on cavity prevention.

3 Questions to Ask Your Pediatric Dentist 


3 Questions to Ask Your Pediatric Dentist
A pediatric dentist is an oral health practitioner that has undergone specialized training in the
field of childcare. As a parent, you are the advocate for your child’s health and well-being,
therefore, it is imperative to choose a pediatric dentist that can perform services and provide
recommendation of the highest level of expertise. You also want to look for a pediatric dentist
that is thoughtful, helpful, patient, and someone your child can consider a friend.
Here are 3 questions to ask a pediatric dentist when deciding upon the best provider for your
child:

1. Do You Use Sealants During Treatments?

A sealant is a modern type of treatment now being used in dental practices, and is the use of a
sealing agent placed upon the surface of the tooth to block out bacteria that can lead to cavities
and tooth decay. This bacteria can also cause gum disease and the use of a sealant can
prevent these serious issues from potentially happening. It is still very important to discuss the
importance of daily brushing, flossing, and healthy eating, and the use of a sealant may not be
needed in dental treatments for your child.

2. Should I Buy a Toothpaste with Fluoride?

Many people have heard both advantages and disadvantages of the use of a fluoride
toothpaste, and is a smart question to ask your pediatric dentist. Some dentists recommend
using fluoride to prevent cavities, and improve your child’s tooth strength. While others do not
feel that a toothpaste with fluoride is essential to a healthy oral routine, and it is made up of
chemicals that people don’t need to achieve a healthy mouth. Ask your dental pediatrician for
their opinion, and you can decide for yourself what you feel is best for your child.

3. Is Thumb-Sucking a Concern For My Child’s Health?

Some parents may be concerned about their child’s thumb-sucking habit, while others consider
it a harmless phase that will pass. However, consistent thumb-sucking can actually be harmful
to the oral health of your child, and if done for a long time, can inhibit natural growth and
development. Thumb-sucking can also cause uneven tooth alignment, and a dentist may be
able to speak with your child about the reasons why it’s not good for them, and can recommend
to you other ways to wean your child off the habit, including corrective procedures for any
misalignment that may have already taken place.

Be sure to ask your pediatric dentist these basic questions before starting any treatments. You
can get a feel for their background and experience, as well as determine whether or not you feel
their personality will be a good fit for your child. After finding a pediatric dentist with a high level
of training and knowledge, the next most important aspect of your child’s dental health is finding
a practitioner your child enjoys and feels comfortable with.

Why Do You need a mouth Guard


  
QUESTION ANSWER

WEIGHTLIFTING RACQUETBALL RUGBY FIGURE SKATING
WHEN DO YOU NEED A MOUTH GUARD? ANY TIME YOU PARTICIPATE IN SPORTS!

HOCKEY

Protect Your Smile

Let’s work together to protect that smile of yours. Just by wearing a mouth guard, you reduce the risk of knocking out teeth or breaking your jaw.

Chances are if you play in organized sports, your coach may already require that you wear a mouth guard. But did you know that even when you’re riding your bike or getting a game together with the kids in your neighborhood that it’s a good idea to wear a mouth guard?

Any time you’re engaged in an activity where your face can come in contact with something hard—say another player, a ball, the pavement, or any hard object—it’s a time that you should be wearing a mouth guard!

Repairing the problems that happen to teeth and jaws is uncomfortable for the patient—and can cost thousands of dollars. Many injuries can be far less severe or even

GYMNASTICS KARATE FOOTBALL CHEERLEADING BOXING WRESTLING INLINE SKATING MOTOCROSS HURDLING SKIING

prevented altogether by the simple act of wearing a mouth guard!

BIKING SOFTBALL TENNIS BASKETBALL FIELD VOLLEYBALL HOCKEY BASEBALL LACROSSE DIVING FENCING SOCCER SKATEBOARD

Mouth guards are a smart investment in your dental health. Let’s talk about the best mouth guard to use while you are having orthodontic treatment. When your treatment is complete, your dentist or I can help you select the right mouth guard.

Get Into The Mouth Guard Habit!
April is National Facial Protection Month is sponsored by the American Association of Ortho- dontists, the American Association of Oral and Maxillo- facial Surgeons, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the Academy for Sports Dentistry.

Mouth guards are a good idea all year long. 

 

Dry Mouth Medicines Your Mouth


Many medications Americans take can affect dental and oral health? Taking certain prescription and over the counter medications can cause dry mouth “xerostomia”, effect your taste buds on tongue which results in ultimate feeling of food taste and even cause changes to your periodontal health ” gums”.
What should you dental care provider dentist and your dental specialists know about my prescription medications?

It is important to tell your dentist and dental hygienist about every medication that you take. They will also want to know how much and how often you take your medicines. Even vitamins, minerals, herbs and natural health supplements are important for them to know about. Learn more here.     L

Information your dentist and dental hygienist need to know about your medications at your dental exam?

Your dentist, oral care professional and dental hygienist need to know all your medications, dosages, medical conditions and why you are taking them so you can receive accurate optimum dental treatment. Prescription medication and OTC supplements you take have side effects that can be important to dental treatment and oral health. 

Over 400 medications can cause dry mouth ” xerostomia” and make your mouth feel dry chronically and gradually without you noticing it immediately. 

The list includes certain drugs for high blood pressure Hypertension, mainly anti depression, and anxiolytics anti anxiety. The list include some cold and allergy medication drugs that can make a person oral mouth very dry gradually.  

Diabetes can cause dry mouth and xerostomia. Severity of dry mouth may contribute to deep root cavities. Lack of hydration not enough to drink or dry indoor places can make our mouths feel parched and very dry. Be sure to tell your dentist and dental hygienist if your mouth feels dry, uncomfortable or painful so that they can help you. A dry mouth can add to your risk of getting cavities, deep root decay, periodontal bone loss, gum disease, bad breath or Halitosis , mouth sores and sometimes systemic infections. A major contributor in difficulty to wear dentures, and to chew and swallow food.

OTC over-the-counter, prescription drugs and herbal medicines can make easy bruising and bleeding more easily. The list include aspirin, ibuprofen, Coumadin®, Pradaxa® and Plavix®. Significant number of herbal supplements cause lack of hemolysis bleeding changes, including garlic, gingko biloba, ginger and ginseng. Inform your dentist, dental specialist and dental hygienist of taking any of these drugs, prescriptions or supplements.

250 drugs and OTC supplements can change the way you taste foods. Some medications produce a bad aftertaste in your mouth. Often people suck on hard candy, breath-mints or even cough drops to make their mouth feel better. Many of these contain sugar, which can lead to cavities. Use sugarless candies and breath-mints instead. If your medicine makes your mouth dry, you might have a problem tasting certain types of foods or foods will taste bland. Do not use too much salt or sugar to make your food taste better. This can lead to more cavities, poor diabetes control and higher blood pressure. Tell your physician or dentist if you notice changes in your sense of taste.

Some drugs can cause sores on your cheeks or under or along the side of the tongue. These mouth ulcers can be painful and can make eating, speaking and wearing dentures difficult. Tell your dentist or physician if you get mouth ulcers so they can determine the cause and change your medicine if necessary.

Many medicines can cause dangerous drug interactions with the medicines given in the dental office. These include pain relievers, sedatives and anesthetics. Talk honestly and openly about your medication use. This allows your dental team to make good decisions about your treatment and helps to ensure your oral health and safety.

Dental Emergency Tips & Advise


Our professional emergency dental care team understands that emergencies are inconvenient for everyone. We are dedicated family dental healthcare providers and we are here for you in these stressful times, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Please call our Dental ER NY offices immediately to request an emergency dental care visit for any dental emergency situations in NY. We do our very best to see emergency cases immediately. If you experience intense bleeding or your emergency extends beyond dental care, please go to the nearest emergency room for assistance or call 911.

Some situations can be remedied or improved by following a few simple tips. While these suggestions do not solve the dental emergency problems you may experiencing, but they offer first-aid care until you will come to our offices or your local emergency room.
Temporary Crown Falls Out:

If your temporary falls out and you still have it, dry your natural tooth, apply a small dab of toothpaste to the temporary and reattach it. You may also use dental wax or temporary adhesive, available at most pharmacies. Please call our office so that we can professionally reattach your temporary as soon as possible.
Knocked Out Tooth:

Rinse the tooth gently under water to remove debris. Place the tooth into the socket it fell from and hold it in place until you get to our office. Otherwise, put the tooth into a baggie of milk and bring it to us so that we can determine whether reattachment is possible.
Cut/Bitten Tongue or Lip:

Thoroughly clean the cut, then hold a cold compress against it. If bleeding does not stop, go to your local emergency room. You may need stitches.
Broken Tooth:

A cracked or broken tooth should be rinsed immediately with warm water. Then hold a cold compress against the affected tooth to reduce swelling while on your way to our office for assistance.
Possibly Broken Jaw:

If you think your jaw may be broken, apply a cold compress and proceed to your local emergency room immediately. If you lost or damaged teeth during your injury, please call us, as well.

Severe Toothache:

Rinse your mouth and the area around the tooth, then floss around the tooth to make sure that debris is not causing the pain. Do not put an aspirin on the tooth because it can damage your gum tissue. Call our office for an appointment if the pain persists.

Something Caught Between Teeth:

Use dental floss to gently remove the debris, and be sure that you don’t cut your gums with the floss. Do not use a sharp instrument to dislodge the debris. If floss doesn’t help, call our office for an appointment.

Dental Anxiety & Phobia Controlling Techniques


Affiliated Dental Office in New York City, are striving to make patient visits a pleasant and productive encounter. The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicate that only about 61 percent of adults between 18 and 64 report seeing their dentist in the preceding year, citing dental-related anxiety as one of the reasons. It is a main goal of all the selected dental specialists to help you get over your anxiety while addressing all your concerns.
Dedicated dental care professionals and their staff will discuss your treatment plan and schedule with you the necessary appointments. They will provide you with attention to your specific issues in order for your visits to a dentist in New York City are positive experiences. All treatment plans are customized according to your dental and health condition, taking personal preferences into account when possible.

Kids Guide To Dental Care


How many times have your parents asked you about brushing your teeth? Do they mention it every morning before you head out to school? Do they bring it up again right before you go to bed? While it may not seem like a big deal, it is so important that you take good care of your teeth! Even the baby teeth that you know are going to be falling out soon need to be kept clean! Here are a couple ways that you can take good care of your teeth:

Brushing and flossing are the most obvious ways that kids can care for their teeth. Did you know that just running a toothbrush over your front teeth isn’t enough? You should be brushing your teeth for at least two minutes, reaching all the way back to get your molars and even behind the teeth to get some of the hidden spaces that are often overlooked. Ask your parents if you can set a timer in the bathroom to keep track of the amount of time you spend brushing or sing a little song in your head while you brush away the bacteria and germs.

Once you are done brushing, there are still a few things that need to be done. Brushing takes away some of the leftover food from the surface of your teeth but sometimes things slip in between your teeth. If left there, the food can turn into a cavity! Dental floss is easy to use, once you get the hang of it. Just place the floss (it looks a lot like regular string) between your teeth and gently move it back and forth. Sometimes when you take a closer look at the floss, you can see some of the food. Gross! Finally, before you leave the sink, take some mouthwash and rinse your entire mouth, swishing the liquid all around. There are certain types of mouthwash that are perfect for kids and your parents will know exactly what to get at the store.

Even if you do a great job of taking care of your teeth, you still need to see a dentist every once in a while. These appointments are about taking a closer look at the teeth and making sure there are no problems that need to be addressed. If you’ve been following through with your brushing, flossing, and mouthwash, your dentist is sure to be impressed. The dentist will clean your teeth before you leave, just to remove some of the things you might have missed and you will be well on your way to a healthy smile!

Dental problems. Out of Sight, Out of Mind?


Not every oral health problem is visible or results in pain or discomfort. Just because you don’t see a dramatic change with your teeth or gums or feel pain, it doesn’t mean your oral health is in ideal shape.

Again, only your dentist has the expertise to determine this, and only regular appointments with your dentist can keep your mouth in the best shape possible.

HEALTHY GUMS AND A HEALTHY HEART: THE PERIO-CARDIO CONNECTION


Cardiovascular disease, the leading killer of men and women in the United States, is a major public health issue contributing to 2,400 deaths each day. Periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory disease that destroys bone and gum tissues that support the teeth affects nearly 75 percent of Americans and is the major cause of adult tooth loss. And while the prevalence rates of these disease states seems grim, research suggests that managing one disease may reduce the risk for the other.

A consensus paper on the relationship between heart disease and gum disease was published concurrently in the online versions of two leading publications, the American Journal of Cardiology (AJC), a publication circulated to 30,000 cardiologists, and the Journal of Periodontology (JOP), the official publication of the American Academy or Periodontology (AAP). Developed in concert by cardiologists, the physicians specialized in treating diseases of the heart, and periodontists, the dentists with advanced training in the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease, the paper contains clinical recommendations for both medical and dental professionals to use in managing patients living with, or who are at risk for, either disease. As a result of the paper, cardiologists may now examine a patient’s mouth, and periodontists may begin asking questions about heart health and family history of heart disease.

The clinical recommendations were developed at a meeting held earlier this year of top opinion-leaders in both cardiology and periodontology. In addition to the clinical recommendations, the consensus paper summarizes the scientific evidence that links periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease and explains the underlying biologic and inflammatory mechanisms that may be the basis for the connection.

According to Kenneth Kornman, DDS, PhD, Editor of the Journal of Periodontology and a co-author of the consensus report, the cooperation between the cardiology and periodontal communities is an important first step in helping patients reduce their risk of these associated diseases. “Inflammation is a major risk factor for heart disease, and periodontal disease may increase the inflammation level throughout the body. Since several studies have shown that patients with periodontal disease have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, we felt it was important to develop clinical recommendations for our respective specialties. Therefore, you will now see cardiologists and periodontists joining forces to help our patients.”

For patients, this may mean receiving some unconventional advice from their periodontist or cardiologist. The clinical recommendations outlined in the consensus paper advise that periodontists not only inform their patients of the increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with periodontal disease, but also assess their risk for future cardiovascular disease and guide them to be evaluated for the major risk factors. The paper also recommends that physicians managing patients with cardiovascular disease evaluate the mouth for the basic signs of periodontal disease such as significant tooth loss, visual signs of oral inflammation, and receding gums.

While additional research will help identify the precise relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, recent emphasis has been placed on the role of inflammation – the body’s reaction to fight off infection, guard against injury or shield against irritation. While inflammation initially intends to have a protective effect, untreated chronic inflammation can lead to dysfunction of the affected tissues, and therefore to more severe health complications.

“Both periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are inflammatory diseases, and inflammation is the common mechanism that connects them,” says Dr. David Cochran, DDS, PhD, President of the AAP and Chair of the Department of Periodontics at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. “The clinical recommendations included in the consensus paper will help periodontists and cardiologists control the inflammatory burden in the body as a result of gum disease or heart disease, thereby helping to reduce further disease progression, and ultimately to improve our patients’ overall health. That is our common goal.”

Importance of Nutrition for Your Oral Health


Proper nutrition acts as an effective way to ensure optimal health and prevent the occurrence of disease. Moreover, receiving adequate nutrients from a variety of healthful foods and beverages can positively impact dental health. Certain foods with poor nutritional composition can increase the incidence of tooth decay and other detrimental dental conditions, leading to the need for treatments such as root canal therapy or dental implants. Additionally, combinations of certain food substances can elevate the risk for cavities.

Current research suggests that antioxidants are often found in foods like fruits, beans, and vegetables—may positively affect immunity and increase the body’s agency to fight infection and inflammation, which aids in protecting an individual’s teeth and gums. Certain foods have even been demonstrated to have a significant consequence on the mouth’s ability to manage decay-causing bacteria.

Calcium operates as one of the best nutrients for oral health. Items such as milk, yogurt, and fortified juice assist in promoting healthy teeth and bones, which diminish the risk for tooth loss. For individuals who dislike dairy products, adding powdered milk to cooked dishes can confer the same benefits. In particular, cheese releases a burst of calcium. This calcium can attach itself to an individual’s teeth, immediately assisting in remineralization of tooth enamel.

Fruits and vegetables—specifically ones that are crisp such as apples, carrots, and celery—aid dental health by removing plaque from teeth and freshening breath. Furthermore, antioxidant vitamins like vitamin C help fortify gums and other oral tissues from harmful bacterial infections. Research points to a link between fresh cranberries and their ability to hinder oral bacteria from forming damaging plaque.

Folic acid, a member of the vitamin B group, stands as an excellent choice to promote dental health due to its ability to support cell growth throughout the body. Green leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale should be eaten regularly. Additionally, brewer’s yeast operates as a substance rich in folic acid.

Cavity-causing agents feast on the sugars found in foods such as soda, candy, cookies, and pastries. These agents transform the sugar into acid, which bombards tooth enamel and results in tooth decay. Acidic foods—like citrus fruits, juices, pickles, sour candies, and wine—can erode tooth enamel to become overly sensitive and discolored.

The timing of meals can also affect oral health. Foods that require a lengthy chewing time, or that are held in the mouth such as hard candies and cough drops can significantly damage teeth as sugar is held against teeth for a long time.

Many health professionals discourage snacking on sugary, starchy, and acidic foods throughout the day. Ideally, individuals should avoid these foods to preserve optimal oral health. However, if an individual wishes to enjoy an occasional treat, it is recommended these sub-prime foods be consumed during a meal to minimize contact between acid and an individual’s teeth. Additionally, the body fashions extra saliva to digest bigger meals; thus, harmful bacteria are washed away before they can negatively impact teeth.

Paul J Ganjian

Email: pganjian@bxdental.con

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