WHAT YOU EAT IS WHAT YOUR TEETH ARE!!


According to the American Dental Association, what you eat is what your teeth are. To take care of teeth you need to consider what you eat, some foods such as sweets and candy only contributes to tooth decay. To determine what someone really eats, you should look at their mouth it will surely speak volumes and to prevent common gum disease such as gingivitis and periodontisis. Below are some of the foods that are healthy for your teeth:
Yogurt: High in calcium and proteins which both contributes to the health of your teeth. Yogurt has probiotics which is a beneficial bacteria used to protect your gums from harmful bacteria. Like fighting with then they get rid of bacteria that could cause cavities, when you opt to include yogurt in your diet the plain variety is the most suitable and appropriate one.

Cheese: If you love cheese then you are one of the lucky one, similar to yogurt they have a high pH which prevents tooth decay. Through chewing it cheese prevent a dry mouth by increasing the amount of saliva in your mouth, the calcium and protein quality in it strengthens the tooth enamel.

Leafy greens: Full of vitamins with fewer calories they include kales and spinach, these vegetables helps improve your oral health. The calcium quality in it helps build the teeth’s enamel; they offer other numerous health benefits which are treating gum diseases in pregnant women due to the folic acid and vitamin B.

Apple: Not only is it sweet, but it also has high fiber and water content. Apple prevents dry mouth by producing saliva which gets rid of bacteria and food particles, it helps prevent bad breath. Apple can be used to remove stains from your mouth after meal any meal consumption, not similar to brushing your teeth but it can replace it for a while until you get a chance to brush.

Carrot: Similar to apples, they are crunchy and have a high fiber and water content, increases the saliva content after every meal, not only does it contributes to strong bones and teeth, but it is also a great source of Vitamin A.

Celery: Full of fiber and water, it scrapes off food particles and bacteria from your mouth similar to a toothbrush. It has an excellent source of Vitamin A and C that keeps your gums and teeth healthy, to enjoy a lovely meal you can top it up with cream cheese.

Almonds: Good source of protein and calcium, it also strengthen your teeth and bones. It is good for the teeth because it is low in sugar, you can have it for lunch or mixed with some salad.

In a nutshell, not only should you take care of what you eat, but also consider what you are drinking too. Try to avoid drinks that has calories and sugar, hence water is the only best drink for you as compared to drinking soda or juice, to have that perfect smile that you have always longed way try to watch your diet.

Written by Paul J Ganjian, DDS, from Chemogan Pharmaceutical Research

Next Generation Dental ™ provides such services as Full Dental Care and Nutritional Consultation. Craniosacral therapy, Nutrition consulting. You may contact Paul Ganjian at: pganjian@nxdental.con

Importance of Nutrition for Your Oral Health


Proper nutrition acts as an effective way to ensure optimal health and prevent the occurrence of disease. Moreover, receiving adequate nutrients from a variety of healthful foods and beverages can positively impact dental health. Certain foods with poor nutritional composition can increase the incidence of tooth decay and other detrimental dental conditions, leading to the need for treatments such as root canal therapy or dental implants. Additionally, combinations of certain food substances can elevate the risk for cavities.

Current research suggests that antioxidants are often found in foods like fruits, beans, and vegetables—may positively affect immunity and increase the body’s agency to fight infection and inflammation, which aids in protecting an individual’s teeth and gums. Certain foods have even been demonstrated to have a significant consequence on the mouth’s ability to manage decay-causing bacteria.

Calcium operates as one of the best nutrients for oral health. Items such as milk, yogurt, and fortified juice assist in promoting healthy teeth and bones, which diminish the risk for tooth loss. For individuals who dislike dairy products, adding powdered milk to cooked dishes can confer the same benefits. In particular, cheese releases a burst of calcium. This calcium can attach itself to an individual’s teeth, immediately assisting in remineralization of tooth enamel.

Fruits and vegetables—specifically ones that are crisp such as apples, carrots, and celery—aid dental health by removing plaque from teeth and freshening breath. Furthermore, antioxidant vitamins like vitamin C help fortify gums and other oral tissues from harmful bacterial infections. Research points to a link between fresh cranberries and their ability to hinder oral bacteria from forming damaging plaque.

Folic acid, a member of the vitamin B group, stands as an excellent choice to promote dental health due to its ability to support cell growth throughout the body. Green leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale should be eaten regularly. Additionally, brewer’s yeast operates as a substance rich in folic acid.

Cavity-causing agents feast on the sugars found in foods such as soda, candy, cookies, and pastries. These agents transform the sugar into acid, which bombards tooth enamel and results in tooth decay. Acidic foods—like citrus fruits, juices, pickles, sour candies, and wine—can erode tooth enamel to become overly sensitive and discolored.

The timing of meals can also affect oral health. Foods that require a lengthy chewing time, or that are held in the mouth such as hard candies and cough drops can significantly damage teeth as sugar is held against teeth for a long time.

Many health professionals discourage snacking on sugary, starchy, and acidic foods throughout the day. Ideally, individuals should avoid these foods to preserve optimal oral health. However, if an individual wishes to enjoy an occasional treat, it is recommended these sub-prime foods be consumed during a meal to minimize contact between acid and an individual’s teeth. Additionally, the body fashions extra saliva to digest bigger meals; thus, harmful bacteria are washed away before they can negatively impact teeth.

Paul J Ganjian

Email: pganjian@bxdental.con

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