WHAT YOU EAT IS WHAT YOUR TEETH ARE!!


According to the American Dental Association, what you eat is what your teeth are. To take care of teeth you need to consider what you eat, some foods such as sweets and candy only contributes to tooth decay. To determine what someone really eats, you should look at their mouth it will surely speak volumes and to prevent common gum disease such as gingivitis and periodontisis. Below are some of the foods that are healthy for your teeth:
Yogurt: High in calcium and proteins which both contributes to the health of your teeth. Yogurt has probiotics which is a beneficial bacteria used to protect your gums from harmful bacteria. Like fighting with then they get rid of bacteria that could cause cavities, when you opt to include yogurt in your diet the plain variety is the most suitable and appropriate one.

Cheese: If you love cheese then you are one of the lucky one, similar to yogurt they have a high pH which prevents tooth decay. Through chewing it cheese prevent a dry mouth by increasing the amount of saliva in your mouth, the calcium and protein quality in it strengthens the tooth enamel.

Leafy greens: Full of vitamins with fewer calories they include kales and spinach, these vegetables helps improve your oral health. The calcium quality in it helps build the teeth’s enamel; they offer other numerous health benefits which are treating gum diseases in pregnant women due to the folic acid and vitamin B.

Apple: Not only is it sweet, but it also has high fiber and water content. Apple prevents dry mouth by producing saliva which gets rid of bacteria and food particles, it helps prevent bad breath. Apple can be used to remove stains from your mouth after meal any meal consumption, not similar to brushing your teeth but it can replace it for a while until you get a chance to brush.

Carrot: Similar to apples, they are crunchy and have a high fiber and water content, increases the saliva content after every meal, not only does it contributes to strong bones and teeth, but it is also a great source of Vitamin A.

Celery: Full of fiber and water, it scrapes off food particles and bacteria from your mouth similar to a toothbrush. It has an excellent source of Vitamin A and C that keeps your gums and teeth healthy, to enjoy a lovely meal you can top it up with cream cheese.

Almonds: Good source of protein and calcium, it also strengthen your teeth and bones. It is good for the teeth because it is low in sugar, you can have it for lunch or mixed with some salad.

In a nutshell, not only should you take care of what you eat, but also consider what you are drinking too. Try to avoid drinks that has calories and sugar, hence water is the only best drink for you as compared to drinking soda or juice, to have that perfect smile that you have always longed way try to watch your diet.

Written by Paul J Ganjian, DDS, from Chemogan Pharmaceutical Research

Next Generation Dental ™ provides such services as Full Dental Care and Nutritional Consultation. Craniosacral therapy, Nutrition consulting. You may contact Paul Ganjian at: pganjian@nxdental.con

Pediatric Dentist Advice: How to Tell Your Child Has a Cavity


Pediatric Dentist Advice: How to Tell Your Child Has a Cavity
A pediatric dentist can tell you some things are just unavoidable in the life as a child, and
cavities are one of those instances. With all the prodding and encouragement to brush and floss
well every day, and to make healthy food choices, your child may still end up getting a cavity.
Your pediatric dentist can easily fix the issue once determined, and here are a few ways to tell
that your child is dealing with a cavity:Your child chews on only one side of their mouth. If you have a young child, they may not be able to properly communicate they’re suffering from pain in their mouth. If you can see that your child is consistently choosing to chew food on only one side of their mouth, and it’s always
the same side, your child probably has a cavity.

You can see chalky white spots on your child’s teeth. When your child flashes a smile, and you can easily see white spots or other discolorations on their teeth/tooth, that is a sign that they
have developed a cavity. Schedule an appointment with your pediatric dentist right away to have it looked at.

Your child complains about pain while brushing. It may not be unusual for your child to complain about having to brush their teeth, but it may be abnormal for them to complain about pain while brushing. This is a key sign they are suffering from tooth sensitivity and most likely a cavity.

Your child has a visibly swollen cheek. If you can tell that one of your child’s cheek is swollen compared to the other, that’s a sign something is out of whack, and needing to be immediately
checked out. If your child can’t recall recently falling or bumping into something that may have caused a swollen cheek, be sure to call your pediatric dentist right away.

Prepare your child for their filling appointment. The best thing you can do for your child is to try to diminish any fears they have of seeing the dentist. If you appear to be calm with a positive
attitude, your child will be more likely to not feel as nervous. Showing your child books and pictures of children seeing the dentist, will help to explain that it is a normal and positive experience.

How to prevent cavities in the future. Once your child has seen your pediatric dentist and has gotten their cavity filled, there are certain foods and drinks you should limit as much as possible.
Try to avoid giving your child sugary soda or fruit juice, avoid sticky foods like toffee and other types of candy, and try to see your pediatric dentist twice a year for checkups.

If your child is experiencing any of the symptoms described above, be sure to contact your dental practitioner immediately to schedule an appointment. Your pediatric dentist will be able to
confirm whether your child has a cavity, and the next steps needed to fix the problem along with
tips on cavity prevention.

New research finds link between gum disease, acute heart


Heart attack survivors who suffer advanced gum disease show significantly higher levels of a protein in their blood called C-reactive protein (CRP) than such patients without gum disease, new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill research indicates.

The findings, presented Sunday (Nov. 12) during a news conference at the annual American Heart Association meeting in New Orleans, suggest that the presence of gum disease might increase the risk of a second heart attack in people with a history of heart disease.

“Not only did the heart attack patients with periodontal disease have higher levels of CRP than those without gum disease, but the CRP levels were directly related to the severity of the gum disease,” said Dr. Efthymios N. Deliargyris, an interventional cardiologist and a member of the Center for Oral and Systemic Diseases at UNC-CH. “The more severe the gum disease, the higher the CRP levels.”

Besides Deliargyris, also an instructor in medicine at the UNC-CH School of Medicine, study investigators were Drs. Steven Offenbacher, professor of periodontology and center director, James D. Beck, professor of dental ecology, both at the UNC-CH School of Dentistry, and Sidney C. Smith Jr., chief of cardiology and past president of the American Heart Association.

“We know a lot of risk factors for heart attacks, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and cigarette smoking, but all those combined only explain about two-thirds of heart attacks,” Deliargyris said. “Since about a third of people who suffer heart attacks don’t have those risk factors, there’s a wide search going on for other conditions that may contribute to increased risk.”

Studies at UNC-CH and elsewhere have linked periodontal disease — an advanced form of gingivitis — with increased risk of heart attacks, but it has been unclear what the two conditions have in common, the physician said.

“The one thing we know the two conditions share is that they tend to initiate an immune response, also called an inflammatory response, in the body,” he said. “The most common marker for this response is this C-reactive protein, which is considered predictive of future adverse events like heart attack.”

To learn how common severe gum disease was in heart attack victims, the UNC-CH team conducted their pilot study of 38 heart attack patients and matched them with a comparable group of 38 other people without known heart disease. Researchers found a high percentage of the former had periodontal disease — 85 percent — as compared with only 29 percent of the controls.

“The most exciting finding was that among people with a heart attack, those with periodontal disease had much higher CRP levels than those with a heart attack but no periodontal disease,” Deliargyris said. “It seems that the presence of periodontal disease on top of a heart attack has a synergistic effect and a very accentuated CRP release.”

Despite its small size, the study findings are the first of their kind and potentially very important, he said.

“This gives us an insight into possible mechanisms underlying the association between gum disease and heart disease,” Deliargyris said. “Now we believe that patients with a heart attack and periodontal disease have an exaggerated inflammatory response with higher CRP levels that might put them at risk for future heart attacks. This work also raises the possibility that by treating severe gum disease in people with heart attacks, we might be able to reduce their CRP levels and their risk of another heart attack.”

Invisalign Premier Provider


Dr. Paul o& Benjamin Ganjian of Next Generation Dental have been recognized as an Invisalign Premier Pr vider, placing them among the top five percent of Invisalign practitioners in North America. Each year, Align Technology, Inc., the inventor of Invisalign, a clear, removable method of straightening teeth without wires and brackets, will award Premier Provider status to a select group of Invisalign practitioners in the U.S. and Canada. To qualify, doctors must demonstrate an exceptional level of Invisalign experience and meet Invisalign clinical education requirements. Align launched the Invisalign Premier Provider program in 2005, making Dr.Ganjian one of the program’s inaugural members.

“Premier Provider status indicates to our patients and to the community that not only are we among the most experienced Invisalign practices in the country, but we are also committed to staying current with the latest Invisalign treatment techniques,” said Dr. Ganjian. “That leadership reflects the standard of care that patients can expect from our practice.”

Dr. Ganjian has been practicing for more than seven years and has been treating patients with Invisalign since 2000. Invisalign is a nearly invisible, comfortable, and convenient treatment option for patients who want straighter teeth. To learn more about Invisalign or to schedule a consultation, please call Dr. Ganjian at Next Generation Dental or visit http://www.nxdental.com

Next Generation Dental