Dental office Shadowing for Dental School Admission

Shadowing
Students often decide they want to become dentists at different points in their lives—some know as early as middle school, while others don’t decide until their third year of college. Whenever you made your choice, you have to be sure to prepare yourself to pursue this profession and shadowing a dentist is a crucial part of that process.
Shadowing: going to a dentist’s or dental specialist’s office to observe procedures, learn terminology and techniques, observe different practice environments and ask the dental professional questions about his or her journey to practicing dentistry.
Dental schools like to see applicants with shadowing experience, as it shows that the student has a solid grasp of what is involved in the practice of dentistry. One critical aspect of practicing dentistry involves understanding patient confidentiality. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, better known as HIPAA, provides strict provisions for safeguarding medical information. Shadowing opportunities enable students to observe first-hand the vital role confidentiality plays in building and maintaining trust with a patient.
Shadowing a dentist will give you the opportunity to confirm and demonstrate your desire to pursue dentistry and also help you picture yourself as a practicing dental professional.
Here are some questions you could ask the dentist or dental specialist you shadow:
What do you like most about your work?

What do you find challenging about your profession?

Would you still pursue dentistry if you could go back in time?

What are some of the highlights of your work?

What gets you excited about coming to work every day?

If you were not practicing dentistry, what would you be doing?

How do you balance work and family life?

Do you participate in any community service?

If you could change something about the practice of dentistry, what would it be?

What did you think about your dental school experience? Do you have any advice?

What was the most challenging aspect of dental school?

Where do I begin?
Start by asking your personal dentist if he or she would be willing to be shadowed.

If your personal dentist is unable to be shadowed, ask if he or she can recommend another practitioner.

Ask your friends, your classmates, your friends’ parents, or your professors to see if their dentist might be willing to be shadowed.

Talk to your health professions advisor.

Reach out to your local dental school to see if they have local alumni who would be interested in being shadowed.

Get informed about HIPAA – it lets the dentist know you understand this important part of patient confidentiality.
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Importance of Dental Hygiene

Good dental health and overall health are linked. There is no two ways about it. If you have an unhealthy mouth, chances are your body is not healthy either. Why? Well, every part of the body is interconnected. So, when you think about your health, don't just think about blood, heart, lungs, etc. think about your oral health as well.

Dental hygiene affects your health in many ways. Poor dental hygiene often results in poor health, whereas good dental hygiene helps you stay on the road to good health. Let's look at some examples: Your mouth has tons of bacteria growing and living in it. This is fact, and can't be avoided, but it can be better controlled. However, these bacteria are only kept under control by daily hygiene practices. So, how does good dental hygiene's affect on control of bacteria affect your health? Well, as the plaque and tartar build up, and take over the mouth, they find their way into the blood stream. Your blood travels all throughout your body, so this can be detrimental to a person's overall health. When infections or bacteria in the mouth enter the blood stream, they can start to attack arteries. In fact, they often attack the heart. It has been shown through many studies that people with poor oral health, and those who practice poor dental hygiene are more at risk for heart disease, stroke, and heart attack than those who take good care of their mouth and practice impeccable dental hygiene.
Dental hygiene does not only affect your health, but if you are pregnant, the dental hygiene your practice can also affect the health of your unborn baby. It is very important for women in childbearing years to be vigilant about keeping good oral health. Many studies have shown that premature birth is often connected to the mother having gum disease. Good dental hygiene almost always eliminates gum disease, and thus greatly reduces your risks of having a baby prematurely. The infection and bacteria caused by poor oral hygiene will lead to gum disease and can end up affecting the development of an unborn child. Although women who are pregnant should not undergo all dental procedures, regular check-ups and cleanings should be maintained, and are important to the health of your fetus.
How else does dental hygiene affect your health? Well, on a more basic level, good oral health means less pain for you to suffer. Pain in your mouth is caused by tooth decay and gum irritation. If you brush and floss properly each day, your gums will be healthy and strong, you will maintain your teeth, and you will have far less decay that leads to cavities. In essence, if you maintain good oral and dental hygiene, you will not have to suffer the pain and stress of trips to the dentist's office.

Another way good dental hygiene and oral health are connected is in nutrition. Part of keeping a healthy mouth is eating right. Eating the right way means less cavities, it also means your body has the nutrients it needs to fight off infections and disease, including gum disease.

Invisalign Premier Provider

Dr. Paul o& Benjamin Ganjian of Next Generation Dental have been recognized as an Invisalign Premier Pr vider, placing them among the top five percent of Invisalign practitioners in North America. Each year, Align Technology, Inc., the inventor of Invisalign, a clear, removable method of straightening teeth without wires and brackets, will award Premier Provider status to a select group of Invisalign practitioners in the U.S. and Canada. To qualify, doctors must demonstrate an exceptional level of Invisalign experience and meet Invisalign clinical education requirements. Align launched the Invisalign Premier Provider program in 2005, making Dr.Ganjian one of the program’s inaugural members.

“Premier Provider status indicates to our patients and to the community that not only are we among the most experienced Invisalign practices in the country, but we are also committed to staying current with the latest Invisalign treatment techniques,” said Dr. Ganjian. “That leadership reflects the standard of care that patients can expect from our practice.”

Dr. Ganjian has been practicing for more than seven years and has been treating patients with Invisalign since 2000. Invisalign is a nearly invisible, comfortable, and convenient treatment option for patients who want straighter teeth. To learn more about Invisalign or to schedule a consultation, please call Dr. Ganjian at Next Generation Dental or visit http://www.nxdental.com

Next Generation Dental


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